This will Help…

help

 

People have said many things to me about my chronic illness. I have chronic migraine and complex post traumatic stress disorder (CPTSD).  I’ve tried for a long time to understand what the point is.  Why would you say these things to someone you care about?

“I go to work when I’m sick, but whatever.”

Okay. Well I hope it wasn’t contagious! Man, I’ve worked when I’ve been so sick I got lost going to see the doctor (neurologist) during my lunch hour.  Did I mention I’d been to his office at least twice before?  I’m not talking about a bad cold or diarrhea.  I’m talking about getting lost in a town I’ve lived in for almost 30 years, going somewhere I’ve been more than once. Not to mention the intense pain of chronic migraines that caused me to seek out the doctor who prescribed the medication that scrambled up my brain.  I’ve gone to work in severe pain too.  So many times its just a blur…

“You need a better plan. That’s why things aren’t working out for you.”

The best plan in the world doesn’t help me if I’m too sick to follow it.  This isn’t about a plan.  Its about me being chronically ill.  It took a long time for me to get this sick.  Its gonna take time for me to recover and/or learn to live with it.  Things aren’t great for me but the kids and I have a safe place to live, food & clothes.  I think we are doing well, especially considering what we have all been through.

“You just need to get over it.”

You first buddy!

“Are you feeling better yet?”

This is such a loaded question.  Better than what?  On the days I don’t have a migraine I’m either exhausted and recovering from one or I’m worried about when the next one will come.  Then there’s the CPTSD.  I want to feel better so badly.  I fight every day to get better.  Please stop asking me this question.  You don’t really want to hear the answer.

“I wanted to be there for you but I was busy.”

I understand you are busy.  I respect your time and other commitments.  I only ask the same of you in return.  Please don’t ask me to run errands for you, take your dog to the vet, or deliver business papers. Don’t stop by unannounced and dump all your problems on me.  My cup is full, overflowing actually.  My priority is my children.  You are a grown-up with no children at home.  I think you can take care of your own stuff.  I’d like to be there for you but I’m to busy fighting to get through my day.

“I know how you feel.”

I doubt that.  If you knew how I feel you’d never say these things to me.  You would understand how confusing it is to have someone you love hurt you in this way.

 

A part of me wants to believe you just don’t understand, but I’ve explained it to you over and over again.  You’ve seen me so sick I couldn’t get out of bed.  What do you think I’m doing here?  Do you really believe I wanted to lose my job?  Can’t you see how hard I fight to take care of my family?  Don’t you think I’d like to get over it?  Somehow you believe I enjoy reliving past trauma?  Sometimes I wonder because I’ve realized you are one of my biggest triggers.  I’ve explained that to you but I guess you were busy or you didn’t listen because you already knew how I felt.  I’ve pleaded with you to stop the behaviors that trigger me.  You know I’ve begged you.

I’m trying hard to see the point.  Why do you say these things to me?  Do you think This will Help?

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Author: Undeniably Sara

Hi, I'm Undeniably Sara. I'm learning how to live well with chronic illnesses by focusing on self-healing with the goal of lifelong health.

4 thoughts on “This will Help…”

  1. That last one – I know how you feel – I hate that. When someone has a hangover I don’t know how they feel, even though I’ve had hangovers in the distant past – so how could I possibly know how someone with different life experiences to mine, AND different brain chemistry, feels? And how could they know how I feel?
    I have no idea how it must feel to be unable to find your way to somewhere you’ve been before, in a town you know like the back of your hand. It must be horrible.
    I hope the good days become more frequent, and the bad days rarer, until you reach the point where you’re stronger than you’ve ever been. It could happen.

    Like

    1. Hello. Good to hear from you. I was in a very abusive and violent marriage for 13 years. The man I was married to was diagnosed with Narcissistic Personality Disorder . He’s also an alcoholic and addicted to prescription pain medication. Lots of crazy. Lots of trauma. Even today, 6 1/2 years after getting away from him he still scares me to death.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Wow! That would be quite scary but it got you to this exact point in your life which is the perfect moment… This moment is what counts… Thank goodness that moment passed!

        Like

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