After the Migraine Attack

The migraine is over, and I’m ready to take on the day — or am I?

The first thing I notice, upon waking, is that the pain is gone, and I feel elated like the pain from yesterday has caused a rebirth in me! I move to get out of bed and sense the soreness that tightens and ripples through my body. I stand up, determined to ignore the aching, but my head reels and swirls causing me to steady myself for a minute. Then, adrenalin cascades through my veins as I contemplate the tasks ahead of me today.

Once dressed, I open the curtains and then immediately close them because the daylight feels too intense and is burning into the pupils of my eyes. A hat, dark sunglasses, and lots of squinting facilitate the morning drive to the kid’s school. Soon, I find myself sitting at my desk, staring at the computer screen and thinking, “What was it that I needed to do today?” I read the to-do list and decide to do it tomorrow and feel comforted by the fact that I actually made a decision..

I decide to write a post about migraine postdrome, also known as migraine hangover, in hopes that it may be helpful to others. For so many years, I was unaware of this final stage of a migraine attack and understanding it has helped me learn to cope better. The worst part of migraine postdrome for me used to be accompanying depression because when I realized that I was unable to perform at a “normal” level of activity after a migraine, I felt weak, lazy, and useless.

Now, I take a step back and remind myself that I can be productive as long as I modify my activity. Simple and mundane tasks are now on the to-do list for today so that when I am feeling better, I’ll have more time to focus on more ones. It is still a struggle for me to quiet the negative self-talk, but I’m very much a work in progress.

Migraine postdrome is real and can last for up to 2 days. With all the focus on treating the migraine attack, we must not lose sight of the final stage of migraine and how to recover in a way that works best for us.

For more information about migraine and migraine postdrome, visit the American Migraine Foundation.

Author: Undeniably Sara

Abuse is an unfortunate reality in this world and is more than physical assault. The invisible trauma we suffer can result in chronic illness, which is a relentless beast gnawing away at the soundness of mind. Education and support from others are vital in the healing journey.

13 thoughts on “After the Migraine Attack”

  1. For me, it’s sometimes hard to separate postdrome from the effects of a sumatriptan, et cetera. I usually associate post-migraine depression to the sumatriptan since it affects serotonin, but this has me rethinking that! I also find irritability to be a real problem in the day or two following a migraine, to the point where I cannot handle checking my emails at times.

    Thank you for the valuable insight!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Your welcome, Mallika. I always rushed back to work as soon as the pain ended and didn’t allow myself any time to recover. I often wonder how much that contributed to my episodic migraine attacks turning into a chronic, almost daily condition.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Our youngest child/son is 14 and was born with pediatric mirgaines which we were only.made.aware.of when he was a toddler. They are awful to.watch a loved.one go through I can only.imagine all that comes.with.it for the individual physical and emotional

    Liked by 2 people

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